Tag Archive: john


Gloomy Modern Days

The ideas of true love, and soulmates, in modern day relationships, are merely utopian. Maybe, just maybe, what we are seeking for, are not the so-called ‘true love’, or ‘soulmates’, but just a person whom you shared so much precious experienced with or someone who gave you so much irreplaceable memories, that you are reluctant to let that person go.

So, what would be the most crucial thing that you look for or expect in love? Is it like the mutual, childish, but kinda shy confession like in Little Manhattan? Would it be a person who would always plan carefully for the future, to make sure everything is okay in the relationship? Would it be a scene, where you and your loved one are walking along the beach, leaning on each other, and watching the sunrise together?

Think about this, think of your favourite moment, were you alone? Or were you with someone? Life is certainly better with company (Up in the Air). Perhaps, the most important element in a relationship, is the consistency, so that the mutual love would never change and the high point of the relationship would last long enough. That is the most attractive yet mysterious thing in love, which traps people to seek for love, despite being hurt again and again.

Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art—
         Not in lone splendour hung aloft the night
And watching, with eternal lids apart,
         Like nature’s patient, sleepless Eremite,
The moving waters at their priestlike task
         Of pure ablution round earth’s human shores,
Or gazing on the new soft-fallen mask
         Of snow upon the mountains and the moors—
No—yet still stedfast, still unchangeable,
         Pillow’d upon my fair love’s ripening breast,
To feel for ever its soft fall and swell,
         Awake for ever in a sweet unrest,
Still, still to hear her tender-taken breath,
And so live ever—or else swoon to death.
(John Keats, Bright Star)
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New Academic Year

Haven’t written for a couple of weeks because my parents came over to see me. It has been a great time. I also saw them growing older and older, and I realise that, it’s my time to take care of my family, and make the immigration plan work (Immigration to Europe). I’m like what Elton John said in his song “My father’s gun”, I shall be taking over my father’s gun

For the new year, I, for sure, have to do well on my degree. Applying for my postgraduate degree is also a must. Apart from that, I’ll also start apply for jobs in Europe (the graduate jobs) so I can also earn some money before going back to study again, while spending my time in Europe (which can probably be useful for my immigration plan).

For table-tennis, I am hoping to be playing in Division 1, as it can test my limit for now. I don’t mind losing some games, as long as I play well. I’m also going to do the UKCC Level 2 course, as it may help if I want to immigrate via work visa.

Holy Moly, the summer holiday has been alright so far, many things happened, but nothing’s gonna change my mind for Europe immigration!

Fragments of memories

American singer Kelly Clarkson has a song called ‘A moment like this’, which says A moment like this, some people wait a lifetime.

Yes, life is often composed of the past, of the memories we have, for certain moments that we always want to remember. After having read quite much Romantic literature (in terms of Romantic period), I can see that most writers at that time agreed with that too. Take my favourite poet John Keats as an example, in his poem Bright Star (which is one of my favourite poems of his), he was trying to capture the moment, that he was leaning towards his girlfriend Fanny Browne; in his Ode to a Nightingale, he was trying to turn the moment that he saw the nightingale into literature. Everyone has different moments that he wants to remember: the happy ones, the sad ones, the romantic ones, the hilarious ones, the touching ones…….. But it has to be unique, and probably special.

Well, do we actually live in the past, or the present? (I think we can neglect the possibility of living in the future as we are not Marty in Back to the Future) We all live in the past. If we think about it this way, life is just composed of all the fragments of memories we had, the ‘present’ that we see, is just going to turn to the past, to the history in the next second, just like Jimmy Hendrix said ‘The story if life is quicker than the wink of an eye), the present does not mean much as it turns to the past too quick. That is probably why my favourite Romantic writer John Keats, immersed himself into describing the memories he had, trying to re-collect some of the best moments he had, with the ‘words brighter than bright, and fairer than fair’ (when he described Fanny in his letter) If, I can travel back in time, I would also like to go through certain moments in my life again. (And of course I would like to visit Keats, as he is sometimes my inspiration of writing.) And the following piece of writing, is for me to remember a friend who is going back home soon. (I rarely write poems, so I am not sure if it is a good one)

Forlorn! Forlorn!
For thou art gone.
Lasting fragments I get,
When thou art back for dawn.

Eternal Sunshine with the waking dream,
Woken by the hateful gleam.
Go back where you belong,
We are fish in different streams.  

 

 

Having studied English literature for two and a half semesters, I genuinely think that the creative pick-up lines nowadays can really be categorized as ‘literature’.

Literature comes from human life, just as Wordsworth claimed, poetry should come from rural life. John Keats had a humble life, and became a great writer. What does it tell us? Literature originates from human life, as writers get inspired from what they see in human life.

Pick up lines, or chat up lines, are as Wordsworth mentioned, human language, as they are actually uttered by normal people. One of my favourite writer, John Keats, also included a pick-up-line-like line in his letter to Fanny Browne, saying ‘I almost wish we were butterflies and liv’d but three summer days – three such days with you I could fill with more delight than fifty common years could ever contain.’ He, as a Romantic writer, is, in my opinion, the beginner of the pink-up culture, a good, healthy, and sensible culture. I would imagine that, Wordsworth, who also agreed that literature comes from normal life, would love the pick-up-line culture, and expand the lines into rhymes, rhymes into poems, poems to a poetry collection. Yes, pick-up poems, pick-up books, pick-up passages that would help you through the ice-breaking process, and kill the dead air.

Do not underestimate the structure and techniques in pick-up lines, as far as I know, a successful pick up line is usually a highly metaphorical one, hopefully rhyme a bit. For example, ‘If you can build any kind of ship in the world, what would you build? I would build a relationship!’ This one is quite a metaphorical one, it may take the hearer a few seconds to realize what happened, its construction is detailed too, putting the ‘ship’ into the word ‘relation’ to make it work, clever. If you have read the poetry of Keats’, you would also find his work is as this line, highly metaphorical. So how can you not call good pick-up lines literature? The line ‘I have got XX kg of muscle of steel, and sex appeal.’ shows that pick up lines can rhyme. No matter how Wordsworth put forward the idea for blank verse, lines that rhyme are always better and more memorable.

Pick up lines are usually successful in making the hearer laugh, and it is usually the first step in building the possible ship, what ship? Relationship. But if you are going for one, don’t quote from Shakespeare for a pick-up line, because it is highly risky. Remember a quote from A Mid Summer Night’s Dream? ‘Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind, And therefore is winged Cupid painted blind.‘ It can be seen as offensive. And for Much Ado About Nothing, ‘For which of my bad parts didst thou fall in love with me?’ Do not try it either, you might get a reply with the title of the play, ‘Just that one, but then I knew it was Much Ado About Nothing.’

Pick-up lines are generally inspired by creativity and the texts you read, the more you read, the more things you can make reference to. For instance, if you do not know anything about the Science, you can never come across the line ‘Hi, I need to accuse you of causing Global Warming because you are too hot.’ Wordsworh’s companion Coleridge is correct, poetry, or perhaps literature, is as logical as Science, but just deeper as it includes Science. There should be a course in English Literature degree called ‘Pick-up course’, because it is an integral part of ANY LITERATURE in the world, and is potentially a new favourite genre of literature. Yes, I am sure if a person can create a pick-up poetry, pick-up story, pick-up biography, or maybe a pick-up novel, he can probably be crowned as the next Keats!